Surprise, Zimbabwe’s Elections Weren’t Fair

The so called “Khampepe Report” has been released which concludes the following regarding Mugabe’s election in 2002.  Communist leaders have fought the release of this report to the public because it details their crimes.

 

  • The elections in Zimbabwe, more than anything else, have been characterised by a high level of polarisation between the Zanu-PF and MDC, and between members of their respective parties.
  • Intimidation and violence in certain areas of Zimbabwe were the hallmark of the pre-election period. At least 107 people, whose names, places of residence and dates of death have been published, were reported killed in attacks related to political violence between March 2000 and election month March 2002. Although police were extremely reluctant to provide statistics, the majority of these victims are said to be members or supporters of the MDC.
  • It is common cause that the Zanu-PF has established a military trained youth group, known as youth militia. Reports by the SA and other observer missions show that these youth militia have been the primary perpetrators of violence and intimidation against members and supporters of the MDC or sections of the population that appear not to support Zanu-PF.
  • In varying degrees, this election-related violence and threats of violence, arson and hostage-taking have curtailed freedom of movement, freedom of speech and freedom of assembly and of association of voters.
  • In the lead-up to the presidential elections, the electoral laws of Zimbabwe were amended dramatically and manipulated by executive decrees.
  • Final voter rolls and information on polling stations were not available timeously.
  • There was no equal or equitable access to publicly owned and funded media.
  • The executive government discarded the rule of law by failing to give effect to decisions of the high court and the Supreme Court, and introducing statutory instruments or regulations that altered, reversed or undermined court decisions.
  • Police treatment of supporters of each of the two main candidates appears to have been partial.
  • The number of polling stations in urban constituencies, and particularly in Harare and Chitungwiza, were substantially reduced. This reduction severely curtailed voters’ access to polling stations. On the third day of polling, many voters who wished to cast their vote did not have a reasonable opportunity to do so. The number of voters prevented from voting could not be ascertained.
  • It should, however, be recorded that in all the other constituencies, polling stations were easily accessible to the electorate. The secrecy of the ballot was observed. Requirements such as effective design of ballot papers, ballot boxes, impartial assistance to voters, transporting of election materials where necessary and protection of polling stations were accomplished.

 

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